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slushpilehell:

My novel is actually an instructional booklet for peace for world peace, in the form of a novel, in the form of a mystery, adventure, suspense novel. A drama.

And this is a rejection letter, in the form of a letter of rejection.

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zeroambit:

thinksquad:

Mushrooms have an extraordinary ability to control the weather, scientists have learned. By altering the moisture of the air around them, they whip up winds that blow away their spores and help them disperse. Plants use a variety of methods to spread seeds, including gravity, forceful ejection, wind, water and animals. Mushrooms have long been thought of as passive seed spreaders, releasing their spores and then relying on air currents to carry them. But new research has shown that mushrooms are able to disperse their spores over a wide area even when there is not a breath of wind - by creating their own weather. Scientists in the US used high-speed filming techniques and mathematical modelling to show how oyster and Shitake mushrooms release water vapour that cools the air around them, creating convection currents. This in turn generates miniature winds that lift their spores into the air.

i for one welcome our fungal overlords

zeroambit:

thinksquad:

Mushrooms have an extraordinary ability to control the weather, scientists have learned.
By altering the moisture of the air around them, they whip up winds that blow away their spores and help them disperse.
Plants use a variety of methods to spread seeds, including gravity, forceful ejection, wind, water and animals. Mushrooms have long been thought of as passive seed spreaders, releasing their spores and then relying on air currents to carry them.
But new research has shown that mushrooms are able to disperse their spores over a wide area even when there is not a breath of wind - by creating their own weather.
Scientists in the US used high-speed filming techniques and mathematical modelling to show how oyster and Shitake mushrooms release water vapour that cools the air around them, creating convection currents. This in turn generates miniature winds that lift their spores into the air.

i for one welcome our fungal overlords

(Source: thinksquad, via spadeandhearse)

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lochnessmorgan:

How To Get Away With Murder - Summary

(via spadeandhearse)

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deerhoof:

the future is here and it’s horrible

(Source: pierregrassou, via spadeandhearse)

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kqedscience:

Stem cell treatment causes nasal growth in woman’s back
“A woman in the US has developed a tumour-like growth eight years after a stem cell treatment to cure her paralysis failed. There have been a handful of cases of stem cell treatments causing growths but this appears to be the first in which the treatment was given at a Western hospital as part of an approved clinical trial.
At a hospital in Portugal, the unnamed woman, a US citizen, had tissue containing olfactory stem cells taken from her nose and implanted in her spine. The hope was that these cells would develop into neural cells and help repair the nerve damage to the woman’s spine. The treatment did not work – far from it. Last year the woman, then 28, underwent surgery because of worsening pain at the implant site.
The surgeons removed a 3-centimetre-long growth, which was found to be mainly nasal tissue, as well as bits of bone and tiny nerve branches that had not connected with the spinal nerves.
The growth wasn’t cancerous, but it was secreting a “thick copious mucus-like material”, which is probably why it was pressing painfully on her spine, says Brian Dlouhy at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, the neurosurgeon who removed the growth.”
Read more from newscientist.

kqedscience:

Stem cell treatment causes nasal growth in woman’s back

A woman in the US has developed a tumour-like growth eight years after a stem cell treatment to cure her paralysis failed. There have been a handful of cases of stem cell treatments causing growths but this appears to be the first in which the treatment was given at a Western hospital as part of an approved clinical trial.

At a hospital in Portugal, the unnamed woman, a US citizen, had tissue containing olfactory stem cells taken from her nose and implanted in her spine. The hope was that these cells would develop into neural cells and help repair the nerve damage to the woman’s spine. The treatment did not work – far from it. Last year the woman, then 28, underwent surgery because of worsening pain at the implant site.

The surgeons removed a 3-centimetre-long growth, which was found to be mainly nasal tissue, as well as bits of bone and tiny nerve branches that had not connected with the spinal nerves.

The growth wasn’t cancerous, but it was secreting a “thick copious mucus-like material”, which is probably why it was pressing painfully on her spine, says Brian Dlouhy at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, the neurosurgeon who removed the growth.”

Read more from newscientist.

(via spadeandhearse)

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Tags: animals
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I don’t really want to fight you. I want to talk to you.

(Source: azuila, via littlepinksockofmine)

Tags: atla
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nataliemeansnice:

denim on denim, my southern tuxedo.

- denim button up is from old navy.
- shorts are fat hacked from lane bryant jeans.
- belt and tights and necklace are from forever21 plus.
- brown cut out booties are from urban outfitters.
- bag is vintage coach from my mema.
- glasses are via pretzuls.

(via problematicpraxis)

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freystupid:

An Indian Prince, Philip Alexius de Laszlo

freystupid:

An Indian Prince, Philip Alexius de Laszlo

(Source: 19thcenturyboyfriend, via fuckyeahsouthasia)